Category: News

Dementia
Louise Morse

Stories that show the way through dementia

Yesterday, Dr Jennifer Bute and I were interviewed for a Podcast that’s broadcast from America. (I’ll post the broadcast date when I have it.)This is a Podcast with a difference. It’s based on how stories influence the way people understand various issues in life – in this case, dementia. For instance, do we communicate well with people with dementia, by telling them a story? (It depends on the person and the stage of their dementia.) But we communicate with their care givers and families with stories very well – particularly true stories.

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News
Louise Morse

Shattered mobile phone sends a strong message

This may look like just a shattered mobile phone. But it’s more than that. It’s an allegory! It’s the phone that 19 year old Luke put together for me months before the accident that killed him last December. He sat at the kitchen table working on it patiently asking questions like, ‘do you want Messenger on the front screen?’ and showing me how it worked. ‘Switch on the security screen before you put it in your bag,’ he sighed when I asked why the icons moved all over the place when I put it in my bag. After his death I particularly treasured that phone.

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News
Louise Morse

Put some rocket fuel under this agenda!

If you watched the interviews on TV with Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt you will have seen their responses to the question about funding social care.  Jeremy Hunt said straight away that he would do it, and that he would merge the NHS and social care.

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News
Louise Morse

When management sees staff as humans made in God’s own image

There’s an interesting item in Premier’s digital newsletter this morning about a study that looked at what happens  in the workplace when we treat staff  either as ‘resources’ or beings made in God’s image.  (See ref below). The report titled ‘Human resources – recognising the personhood of workers in the charity and public sectors’, was supported by the Leech Fellowship Committee and Baptist and Anglican churches. 

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Crying woman
News
Louise Morse

Words are powerful and we CAN make a difference

The Government will make an announcement about social care funding at the earliest opportunity, a minister said in reply to MP Nick Thomas-Symonds’ question. What would he say to the two sisters caring for their dying father who were struggling with a disjointed system where they had to fight for the simplest of things? In despair they wrote a letter to The Times. And how do we, as Christians, respond? The Bible is clear that this is what we ought to do.

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Welcome-from-senior-nurse-carer-Jeanette
Caring for older people
Louise Morse

Care not Killing, and new euthanasia lobby move

We don’t want to find ourselves being euthanized because doctors have taken a subjective view of our quality of life, which is what happened in Belgium and was reported earlier in this blog.  Or have a 75 year old woman with dementia being euthanized against her will.

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Caring for older people
Louise Morse

Pensioners contribute £billions more to the Exchequer than the cost of Social Care – so why aren’t they getting it?

Once again, older people are being presented as an economic burden on society. The Chancellor, Philip Hammond, under pressure to produce the long delayed Green Paper on Social Care funding, has warned that taxes will have to keep rising for years to come to cover the cost of caring for Britain’s ageing population. (Cue intergenerational warfare.)

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Healthy living in old age
Louise Morse

Seniors – are you ‘economically vibrant’?

This week a national newspaper invited us to find out if we will be living in a pensioner-dominated area within 20 years.  Dominated is an emotive word, so I read the article carefully.  Does it say that pensioners will be ‘dominating’ the local restaurants or blocking pavements with their walkers, or driving too slowly, or ‘blocking’ beds and A&E units?

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News
Louise Morse

Electrical zapping restores working memory

‘The rhythm of life is a powerful beat,’ Sammy Davis Jr used to sing in the seventies.And, if scientists at Boston University are right, getting that rhythm to the right beat in the brains of older people could restore their short-term working memory to that of 20-year-olds.  Our short-term working memory helps us to keep our plates spinning, storing information for around 10 – 15 seconds to allow problem solving, reasoning, planning and decision making, helping us, for example, to keep a telephone number in mind while writing it down.

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News
Louise Morse

81-year old with osteoarthritis hikes 17 miles over three mountains

After two days in London last week, schlepping along the underground and the miles in between with a heavy overnight bag, I thought I’d done very well. Until I read about 81-year-old Ian Waddell, who’d covered 17 miles and a 5,000 ft ascent in the South Wales Three Peaks Challenge, using sticks and crutches because he has osteoarthritis and joint pain. He’s also had hip and knee surgery.

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